Finkelstein, Noah

Professor
Telephone: 
(303) 735-6082
Fax: 
(303) 492-3352
Office: 
DUAN F1021
Research: 
Physics Education Research - Experimental/Theoretical

Research Interests:

Noah is a physics education researcher who studies the role of context in student learning, and conditions that support or inhibit student learning in physics.

Noah conducts research is in physics education, and particularly the role of context in student learning. He is one of the directors of the Physics Education Research group at Colorado, as well as director of Colorado's Integrating STEM Education program, which supports a variety of programs in STEM Education research and reform at Colorado. Noah studies conditions that support students’ interests and abilities in physics, with research projects that range from the specific (how do students use representations or analogies in learning physics?), to the course-scale (the role of computer simulations in learning, or implementation of Tutorials), to the departmental / institutional scale (what models of educational reform are sustainable and scalable? How can universities effectively partner with communities in Informal Science Education.). His theoretical work seeks to build models of learning that emphasize the critical and inextricable role of context in student learning of physics.

Selected Publications:

  1. C. Henderson, N. Finkelstein, & A. Beach A. (to appear). “Beyond Dissemination in College science teaching: An Introduction to Four Core Change Strategies.” Journal of College Science Teaching, to appear (2010).
  2. C. Turpen and N.D. Finkelstein, "Not all interactive engagement is the same: Variations in physics professors' implementation of Peer Instruction, Physical Review ST: Phys Educ. Research 5, 020101, (2009).
  3. C. Baily*, and N.D. Finkelstein, " Development of quantum perspectives in modern physics," Phys. Rev. ST Phys. Educ. Res. 5, 010106 (2009). S. Pollock and N. Finkelstein, “Sustaining Educational Reforms in Introductory Physics,” Phys. Rev. ST Physics Ed. Research 4, 010110 (2008).
  4. P. Kohl and N.D. Finkelstein, "Patterns of multiple representation use by experts and novices during physics problem solving " Phys. Rev. ST Physics Ed. Research 4, 010111, (2008).
  5. N. S. Podolefsky* and N.D. Finkelstein, "Analogical Scaffolding and Learning Abstract Ideas in Physics: empirical studies." Physical Review, Special Topics: Physics Education Research, 3, 020104, 16 pgs, (2007).
  6. V.Otero, N.D. Finkelstein, R. McCray, and S. Pollock, "Who is Responsible for Preparing Science Teachers?" Science. 313(5786), 445-446 (2006). N D. Finkelstein, et al, “When learning about the real world is better done virtually: a study of substituting computer simulations for laboratory equipment,” Physical Review, Special Topics: Physics Education Research, 1, 010103, 8 pgs, (2005).
  7. N.D. Finkelstein, “Learning physics in context: a study of student learning about electricity and magnetism," International Journal of Science Education, 27, 1187-1210, (2005).